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College Exams Abolished 1921

Posted August 2, 2014 by admin with No Comments in 1920's

ABOLISHING COLLEGE EXAMS A NEW TERROR may await the fearsome student instead of the bed of roses that the removal of the examination test promises. Just what the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania may propose as a substitute for the “mid-years” and “finals” that they have announced abolished will be awaited with interest by academic authorities all over the country. “Examinations were introduced, not for the purpose of instruction,” says the Boston Daily Globe, “but to drive the worst laggards out of town,” and “the device has attained a certain moderate success.” Thus: “Biennially a batch of exceptionally stupid youths is ejected from the lower classes. But it is amazing to what an extent the examinations have failed …

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Correct Colors for Certain Blondes and Brunettes Part 3

Posted July 30, 2014 by admin with No Comments in 1920's

Titian and Auburn Hair Types Part 3 of a 1927 magazine article on choosing fashion colors to suit your hair color and personality THERE are four distinct groups in this class. First, the Titian blonde. The true Titian blonde has flaming red hair that is vivid enough not to be called blond and light enough not to be called auburn; blue, gray or green eyes and a fair, colorless complexion. Any deviation from this true type must be taken into consideration when selecting shades—complexion deviations in particular. Second, the Titian brunette. The true Titian brunette has flaming hair, brown eyes and fair, colorless skin. Third, the auburn blonde. This type has hair that is copper colored, darker than Titian hair, …

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Free Biscuit Recipes from 1924

Posted July 30, 2014 by admin with No Comments in 1920's

PINWHEEL BISCUIT RECIPE To create variety, a baking-powder biscuit mixture may be made into pinwheel biscuits, a kind of hot bread that is always pleasing to children. Such biscuits, which are illustrated in Fig. 14, differ from cinnamon rolls only in the leavening agent used, cinnamon rolls being made with yeast and pinwheel biscuits with baking powder. More biscuit recipes here… PINWHEEL BISCUITS (Sufficient to Serve Six) 2 c. flour 1 tsp. salt 4 tsp. baking powder 2 Tb. fat 3/4 c. milk 2 Tb. butter 1/3 c. sugar 1 Tb. cinnamon 3/4 c. chopped raisins To make the dough, combine the ingredients in the same way as for baking-powder biscuits. Roll it on a well-floured board until it is …

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Duncan Phyfe Furnishings Part 3

Posted July 27, 2014 by admin with 1 Comment in 1920's

ALL the modern furniture in the living room pictured has been chosen because of its distinct Duncan Phyfe characteristics, or else for its suitability for blending harmoniously with the modem renditions of this style. The sofa has real distinction, a swing and flare of line ennobled by its delicately carved frame of mahogany and its fine upholstery. The atlas globe is remarkable for the beauty of its Phyfe stand of mahogany; the flip-top card table shows a lyre motif in its under-construction ; the small side chair, one of a pair, shows the use of the lyre motif also in its back. A wing chair of about this time and a comfortable flounced armchair add notes of variety in their …

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Sofas of Distinction Part 2

Posted July 21, 2014 by admin with No Comments in 1920's

In choosing a sofa the size of the room must be considered, as well as the scale of the other furniture with which it is to be used. If space must be conserved there is no better way of doing it than by selecting a sofa of three-quarter size, which is more than adequate for most occasions. Such sofas may be found in various lengths, from about forty-five to sixty inches over-all, the latter dimension being sufficiently important and very adaptable for rooms of medium size. Desirable three-seat sofas come from sixty-six to ninety inches over-all in length, depending upon type—the greater lengths usually being found in especially large-sized Virginia sofas. In the entirely overstuffed style, an average and very …

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Ice Concrete 1927

Posted July 18, 2014 by admin with No Comments in 1920's

ICE CONCRETE This is the name of a new, porous, astonishingly light building material invented in Finland. Like ordinary concrete, it is composed of cement and sand. Crusht ice or snow is used during the process of mixing. Says Waldemar Kaempffert in the New York Times: Heat evaporates the water of the melting ice, and the result is a block or brick uniformly honeycombed with minute pores. The number of pores varies directly with the quantity of ice or snow mixed with the cement and sand. Building blocks thus made are exceedingly light and durable. In a house or office building of ice concrete there is a saving of weight varying from 20 to 50 per cent. Because they are …

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Paying for Education 1927

Posted July 15, 2014 by admin with No Comments in 1920's

TO MAKE STUDENTS PAY MORE The Literary Digest for July 2, 1927 TO MAKE IT EASY to pay for a college education has been the ideal of our institutions, but the saturation point of benevolence seems to have been reached. On one side and another we are adjured to make education cost more. In our issue of June 11 it was pointed out that teachers, through being forced to accept small salaries, were the largest contributors to the support of education. The remedy was to increase the student fees. The same recommendation, based on another argument, is advanced by Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. He would ease up the burden of the endowment system by making students pay more for …

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Adding Cheer and Color to a Dining Room Part4

Posted July 12, 2014 by admin with No Comments in 1920's

To Add Cheer and Color WHERE the dining room happens to be gloomy, with insufficient light and an uninviting outlook, much can be done to add cheer and color by the use of painted furniture and brilliant draperies against light tinted walls. One effective method of furnishing such a room would be by the use of blue green painted furniture that can be found in simple designs, with a drop-leaf table and bow-back Windsor type of chair. The walls should be cream and the draperies blue green, with red and orange figures. Add a table runner of plain dull blue with gay ends of appliqued figures like the drapes, and the warmth of growing plants and ferns, and the gloom …

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